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Topic | Help.....image sizing
picsunique
Hi All,
Advice needed, when resizing say an image of a model to fit say onto a different size page, the image (model) looks slightly, wider, taller not in proportion - is their a quick way to correct this. When resizing say the page I leave the constraints box ticked but sometimes want to use a custom size and this uses default.....again advice?
picsunique , Photographer  posted on 01/03/2010 13:03:01   Posted 61 times

Located:Parbold,Lancashire, UK
Member Since: 27/01/2010
       
Kitaeru
When using constrain proportions, you'll generally be only modifying one edge and leaving the application to sort other dimension for you...

If you need an image to a particular set of dimensions, your best bet is to do the above to get one edge correct and then crop to get the image down to the specific size you're after.

Hope that makes sense! (does in my head  Member Image )

Steve
Kitaeru , Photographer  posted on 01/03/2010 14:13:26   Posted 31 times

Located:Wigan,Greater Manchester, UK
Member Since: 23/12/2009
       
krackers
Set the size you want in the menu that appears at the top when you click on the crop button.  So if you want 10" x 8" set those sizes along with the resolution and the software will crop to that size.  (Make sure you have the preferences set to inches, cms or pixels - whatever you want to show in the crop menu; although you can add "in" for inches etc if preferences are set differently.)

Once you start to crop you can move the crop box around to get the best composition, and adjust - make larger, smaller  etc - to your hearts desire and it will keep the correct proportions. 

Hope that helps.

Dave


krackers , Photographer  posted on 01/03/2010 21:47:53   Posted 2 times

Located:Southend,Essex, UK
Member Since: 07/11/2008
       
hovephotoman
There are various ways and tools you can use to do this.  Seems by the other replies its assumed you are using photoshop, is that what you are using?  In general, if you resize an image and dont keep the constrain proportion settings on, you may change the proportions of it, so it will distort whatever the image is of. And this isnt specially the way you'd want to resize something for a specific page size.

If you think about cropping rather than resizing, youre less likely to distort the photo. So, crop to the right proportions first, then resize.  Or if using the crop tool in PS, you can do both at same time.

If you reply with what software you are using, i can help in more detail.

cheers

mike
hovephotoman , Photographer  posted on 01/03/2010 23:58:04   Posted 55 times

Located:Hove,East Sussex, UK
Member Since: 12/10/2008
       
picsunique
Hi Mike, thanks for the info, I am using CS4....P-Shop.
Everyone else thank you for your info as well...
picsunique , Photographer  posted on 02/03/2010 14:02:19   Posted 61 times

Located:Parbold,Lancashire, UK
Member Since: 27/01/2010
       
hovephotoman
Hi

Ok, as your using CS4, Im going to assume you know all the tools, so...

Method 1

I guess the simplest one step way is to use the crop tool.  Click the crop tool (C), then look at the menu bar at the top of the screen as it now shows options for the crop tool.

In the width and height, enter your required measurements. If you only enter figures in these boxes e.g. 10 in one and 8 in the other, the unit of measurement is taken from what is set in the Preferences under Units and Rulers.  However, you can override this default setting by entering units as well.  So lets assume you want to resize an image to print portrait, 10x8 inches:

In the crop tool width enter 8 inch, in the Height enter 10 inch.  If you don't enter a resolution (e.g. leave it blank), PS will not resample the image.  However, if you want the 10x8 print to be 300dpi, enter 300 in the resolution box and select pixel/inch.

Once this done, drag in the image to make your selection, then double click in the selection to crop (and resample) the image.  Note that the method of resampling is also taken from Preferences under General and Image Interpolation.

If you use one particular setting often, you can save the above settings by using the drop down on the left of the crop tool toolbar.


Method 2

Select the rectangular Marquee tool (M)  and in the style in the tool bar, select fixed ratio.

Enter the ratio of your image e.g. 8 in the width, 10 in the height, then drag to make your selection. Then from the image menu, select crop.  At this point the image is the right ratio, but may not be the right size, so this is when you go to the Image Size option in the Image menu and change the document size as required.


Other notes

In general, unless you want to distort an image, whenever you use the Image Size option, you would almost always leave Constrain Proportions selected when resizing, otherwise you get the stretched look you are experiencing.

There is more to explain for both of these options, but i think Ive given you enough to work on to start with.

If anything doesn't make sense, let me know, although these instructions are similar to what some others have indicated anyway, so I hope your soon up and running with it.

Mike
hovephotoman , Photographer  posted on 02/03/2010 15:19:59   Posted 55 times

Located:Hove,East Sussex, UK
Member Since: 12/10/2008
       
picsunique
Hey Mike....your a legend!
Used the crop toll and yep it is so much better and with little effort. The only annoying thing is if you have a image that is in different proportions to what you want to crop too I find myself having to loose some of the image to get it correctly positioned or white background eraser tool to remove any sharp edging! 
Again thank you....
picsunique , Photographer  posted on 02/03/2010 16:03:15   Posted 61 times

Located:Parbold,Lancashire, UK
Member Since: 27/01/2010
       
hovephotoman
yes, that will always be the case.  Think about printing a square image on an A4 sheet of paper, in general you have 2 choices, leave white space around the image or crop some of the image off to make it fit.  This is basic cropping technique.

Of course the 3rd choice is to stretch the image to make it fit, but then it gets distorted.
hovephotoman , Photographer  posted on 03/03/2010 01:34:32   Posted 55 times

Located:Hove,East Sussex, UK
Member Since: 12/10/2008
       
stan182

Quoting post from picsunique
Hi All,
Advice needed, when resizing say an image of a model to fit say onto a different size page, the image (model) looks slightly, wider, taller not in proportion - is their a quick way to correct this. When resizing say the page I leave the constraints box ticked but sometimes want to use a custom size and this uses default.....again advice?


Easy, ctrl T
free transform function..quick and easy way of adjust layer sizes.

note: you can't use this function on background layers,so you will have to duplicate the background layer and then free transform the duplicated layer.
or you could just drag an existing image onto a new file.



stan182 , Digital Retoucher  posted on 15/06/2010 15:35:26   Posted 4 times

Located:Churton Park,, New Zealand
Member Since: 15/06/2010
       
stan182

Quoting post from picsunique
Hey Mike....your a legend!
Used the crop toll and yep it is so much better and with little effort. The only annoying thing is if you have a image that is in different proportions to what you want to crop too I find myself having to loose some of the image to get it correctly positioned or white background eraser tool to remove any sharp edging! 
Again thank you....


in this case you should open a new document of much larger resolution.
I always start a new file of over 1500x1500 even if the image im editing us much smaller.
it just makes working with the space much easier.
and when you are done editing and resizing images,just crop out the white and your done.
When doing prints,you always want to have a high dpi(resolution)..best setting is 300dpi or above for better quality.

stan182 , Digital Retoucher  posted on 15/06/2010 15:44:38   Posted 4 times

Located:Churton Park,, New Zealand
Member Since: 15/06/2010
       
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